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Old Sep 09, 2013, 01:05 PM
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Originally Posted by EJWash1 View Post
Do you have experience with glassing?

EJ
No experience whatsoever lol... But then again I didn't have any experience with model building until this kit. So hopefully it is not hard to learn?
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Old Sep 09, 2013, 01:19 PM
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Not difficult at all. I see the manual doesn't give you a play-by-play though.

I don't have the time now, but I'll pass along the way I've done it a little later.

EJ
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Old Sep 09, 2013, 01:20 PM
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Okay sounds great, thank you.
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Old Sep 10, 2013, 03:00 PM
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Does walmart, lowes by chance carry 6oz fiberglass cloth? I am trying to avoid having to order online and wait for it to be shipped to me. I may just run by there tonight and check and see if they carry it.
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Old Sep 10, 2013, 03:08 PM
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They might. Also try an auto parts store.

EJ
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Old Sep 10, 2013, 05:03 PM
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I can't remember for sure, but I believe there is glass cloth included in the kit.
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Old Sep 11, 2013, 01:40 AM
Zor
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It will be interesting to learn from a partcipant in this thread how to glass a model; how he has done it.

Note that there is many articles on the subject by doing a search on the internet.

No need to reinvent the wheel .

Zor
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Old Sep 11, 2013, 07:52 AM
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How rude, but typical!

Trevor,

I posted that I would pass along how I've glassed my wing's center section, and I will. Some may think this is some sort of race, but it isn't, now is it?

If there are so, so many demonstrations of how to glass a wing's center section, where are the links to them? (queue in the sound of crickets). Better yet, since learning from those with EXPERIENCE is *the* best example, it would be better if as many with EXPERIENCE contributed to the cause, right? (there's those crickets churpping again - )

Gotta run for now, but, "I'll be bock"...

EJ

P.S.: I almost forgot - 9,207!!!
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Old Sep 11, 2013, 09:34 AM
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I'd wait for EJ's description. His work on hidden areas of models is better than some people's finished (exposed) product.
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Old Sep 11, 2013, 03:07 PM
Zor
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As I suggested, searching the internet has the answer.
I searched for glassing model airplanes and got 114,000 results.

No need to post these URLs.

It would be interesting to read any better detailed procedure from the experienced builders if the method is ever posted and not just copied text from some of the search results.

Consider that if the glassing is only to reinforce the joint of two wings at their center it is really a method of extending the cementing (gluing) binding area which I often recommended for any joint of the model and referrred to as double gluing and filleting. It is also identical to using fabric for overall covering compared to shrinking plastic film.

Personally I prefer wings that can be easily removed individually and make modifications as necessary to achieve that.

Zor
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Old Sep 11, 2013, 04:10 PM
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I never said I had a "better way", I said that I'd post the way *I* glass a wing's center section. The "better way - my way or the highway" is the approach of the INEXPERIENCED (oh, and 9,211 by the way) And yes, I am sure that there are many internet postings, but how many on specifically applying fiberglass cloth to a wing's center section? There's those darn crickets again!

So, below is my way Trevor, for your review.

I used to wrinkle my nose when it came time to fiberglass a wing's center section, then I accepted it as a necessary evil. Overall, it's no big deal. The most recent model I've applied center section glass to is my Sig Komet pattern plane. 5-ounce cloth seems to be the popular weight of cloth. Like Tom alluded to, your kit may include a strip of cloth for this purpose. If not, you'll have to chase some down. You should be able to find the cloth in a 3"-wide tape format. With tape, the edges are woven, not loose. If you do not find tape, you'll have to cut a piece of wider cloth down to 3" strip long enough to wrap-around the top and bottom of the wing. Once the tape is cut though, handle it carefully because the strands of weave will be loose and it falls-off easily.

Elevate the wing above your work surface at the tips so there is a 2"-3" gap between the wing and the work surface. It also helps to stabilize the wing with sandbags or shot bags to keep it from moving. I have shot bags and use them to both elevate and stabilize the wing. Sand or lead (or steel) shot in a plastic sandwich bag works well.

I like to use a slow-drying epoxy resin to apply the cloth. I've used West System epoxy in the past, but Tom turned me on to Z-poxy which is a 50:50 resin/hardener mix instead of West's 5:1 - much easier to mix. You could use :30-minute epoxy as well, but I prefer the slower set of the West and Z-poxy as to maximize wood penetration. Back in "The Day", I used polyester resin which is still yet another option.

I apply masking tape on the wing just outside (1/2"-3/4") the 3"-wide glass cloth area to contain the resin and get a neater finish. Next is the laying of the cloth. Some builders will apply a light coat of resin before the cloth to hold the cloth in position while applying the resin directly to the cloth to saturate the weave. Some builders lay the cloth down on a dry wing. I've tried it both ways and really can't tell a difference - your choice. Cut your cloth strip long enough to cover both the top and bottom of the wing. You'll be applying the resin to both sides of this process at the same time.

Once your cloth is in place, pour a small amount of resin on the cloth. Use an old credit card or a plastic hotel room key to squeegee the resin into the cloth's weave. You will see the cloth become more and more transparent as the resin fills the weave. If you don't have a plastic card, you can use a small sheet of balsa, or you could use a paint brush and daub the resin into the cloth. I used to use paintbrushes to apply the resin, but I used a plastic card a couple of years back and prefer them now. Now, if you cut your cloth strip from a larger piece of cloth be careful to work the resin in from the outer edge inward to keep the strands of cloth in tight.

At this point you will want to remove the excess resin. If you used a squeegee (plastic card, balsa) you have already removed enough resin if you can see the weave of the cloth rather than a shiny sheen of resin. If you did not use a squeegee, you can use a roll of toilet paper to remove the excess, rolling in the direction as not to leave a trail of paper on the cloth. When the excess resin has been removed, remove the masking tape from the borders of the cloth. let the resin set overnight.

After the resin has cured, I re-apply masking tape to the edges of the resin. Apply a very light coat of resin to the cloth. This is your float coat and is applied to fill the valleys between the strands of the cloth's weave. Squeegee the excess, remove the tape, and let the resin cure. Reapply masking tape to the borders of the cloth again. You will be sanding the cloth, and the tape is to protect your bare wood from being sanded. Sand the cloth area with 220-grit sandpaper.

Done.

I wouldn't bother with it with this build, but on my Komet I used a technique that I learned here on R/C Groups from experienced modelers. Instead of using 5-ounce cloth, several layers of a light cloth are used, each strip more narrow than the last. In other words, starting with a 5"-wide 2-ounce cloth, a 4"-wide strip (2-ounce) and finally a 3" (2-ounce) wide strip. Doing this feathers the layers at the edges and the result is a less thick edge that the 5-ounce cloth leaves. Theres a nice tapered presentation.

EJ
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Old Sep 11, 2013, 04:15 PM
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Originally Posted by TomCrump View Post
I'd wait for EJ's description. His work on hidden areas of models is better than some people's finished (exposed) product.
Thanks Tom. Funny how work gets in the way of our hobby, and how some make work out of the hobby, isn't it?

EJ
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Old Sep 11, 2013, 05:02 PM
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Trey (NOT Trevor - sorry),

One thing I left out is that if you have not worked with glass cloth and resin before, it would be a good idea to practice on a sheet of balsa so you get familiar with it instead of jumping right in on your SS.

EJ
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Old Sep 11, 2013, 05:34 PM
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WHOOPEE

and congratulations _ _ _

All we need now are pictures of the work in progress by the experienced fellow illustrating his work.

Forthcoming ? ? ?

Pictures are worth so many text words.
Writing text is easy and does not prove experience.

The reason why I post so many pictures.

The process of using fabric and aircraft dope is identical and do not require the use of plastic card to remove the surplus.
In the case of joining two wing panels together then resin is recommended. We must not forget to check any dihedral angle.

Zor
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Old Sep 11, 2013, 06:06 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EJWash1 View Post
Trey (NOT Trevor - sorry),

One thing I left out is that if you have not worked with glass cloth and resin before, it would be a good idea to practice on a sheet of balsa so you get familiar with it instead of jumping right in on your SS.

EJ
Like EJ states,,it really isn't hard, but a little practice to gain familiarity with the process is a good idea.

In my opinion, the usage of dope is a smelly, more expensive method. I haven't used dope since the 60's.
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