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Old May 21, 2014, 05:56 AM
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Article on Airfoils?

This past weekend, I spent some time reading some articles, both on my computer and on the 'net. I'm trying to find one again. It was on wing ribs/airfoils. It showed symmetrical, semi-symmetrical, Clark Y, and undercambered types, possibly more. There was an illustration of each type done with a grid overlay. There was an explanation of what type airplanes tended to use which airfoils. Like fully symmetrical for control line, semi-symmetrical for RC, and so on.
I thought it was a section in one of the Don Ross books, but no.
I went through a lot of my downloaded articles and internet sites in the course of the weekend and don't remember what it was was I read.
Does anyone have any idea what I was looking at?
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Old May 21, 2014, 10:52 AM
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A little more info. It wasn't a discussion thread. It was either an article posted on the 'net or a magazine scan.
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Old May 21, 2014, 01:28 PM
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Model Aircraft Aerodynamics

Maybe from the book "Model Aircraft Aerodynamics" by Martin Simon?
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Old May 21, 2014, 02:01 PM
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No, I don't think so. I don't think I've ever owned or seen a copy. Thanks for trying.
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Old May 21, 2014, 04:24 PM
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Make that Martin Simons. A 371 page book full of illustrations. Jack
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Old May 21, 2014, 06:29 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JackHiner View Post
Maybe from the book "Model Aircraft Aerodynamics" by Martin Simon?
I was talking to Martin on email yesterday and he tells me he has a fresh issue of this book just completed and off to the publisher. He says he has taken a lot of the foils out because these are now available on the web.
Profili is my go to program for foils. They are all there and you can get the Xfoil generated lift drag curves from it too very easily.
For RC vintage models its good to have a wide speed range so they will come back up wind. I like Clark y and Eiffel 400 (from memory)for that reason. The common RAF 32 is a dog in theory. You can look at all your favorites in profili.

Allan
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Old May 22, 2014, 05:27 AM
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Interesting, Allan. Thanks.
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Old May 22, 2014, 11:39 PM
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Maybe this site ?
http://www.airplanesandrockets.com/r...l-plotting.htm
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Old May 23, 2014, 05:53 AM
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Not the one I'm trying to find, but a very useful one. Thanks, Paul!
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Old May 23, 2014, 06:18 AM
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Browser history?

Often helps me in this kind of situation.
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Old May 23, 2014, 10:43 AM
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Already checked and no luck. I suspect I saved the article as a complete web page and gave it an irrelevant name by mistake.
Thanks for trying.
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Old May 23, 2014, 12:41 PM
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One or two of the old thick books had illustrations like you're describing. But they were intended more as a "this sort of airfoil is used for....." rather than being intended as specific options. From your description of what this was about you've already gotten that message.

Are you looking for something that is specific? Or recommendations for what to use for some project?

Of course since this is in the Vintage and Old Timers forum the plans you have should already have the airfoils on them.
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Old May 23, 2014, 06:53 PM
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Bruce, I'm looking for one of the airfoils illustrated. It seemed very close to one used in a plan I have that isn't too clearly drawn.
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Old May 23, 2014, 07:05 PM
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Here's a little more air foil info that may be of interest.
The first attachment was too large and would not load.
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Old May 23, 2014, 07:09 PM
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Here's the forward to the book-

AIRFOILS AT LOW SPEEDS
Copyright 1989 by Selig, Donovan, and Fraser
All rights reserved

FOREWORD AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
The history of this experimental program on low-speed airfoils is extensive.
In August 1986, work toward testing model sailplane airfoils in a wind tunnel at
Princeton University began on an ambitious scale. The initial plan was to test
30 airfoils: 15 existing airfoils and 15 new airfoils to be designed concurrently
with the tests. As news of the project caught the attention of radio control (RC)
model soaring enthusiasts, the project grew far beyond the original goals and
expectations, thanks to their generosity. When the experimental apparatus was
finally dismantled in January 1989, almost two and a half years later, over 60
models were tested and over 130 airfoil polars were generated. It is our hope
that the results of this work will be valuable to modelers and researchers for
many years to come.
A word is in order to explain the role each of us played in this effort. The
initial impetus for the project, its organization and day-to-day management,
as well as the wind tunnel testing and data reduction were done by Selig and
Donovan. They also designed all of the new airfoils except for the DF -series by
Fraser.
The custom measurement apparatus was built jointly by Selig and Donovan at
Princet.on University and by Fraser at Fraser-Volpe Corporation. The digitizing
of the models was done at Fraser-Volpe Corporation by Fraser, who also wrote
the computer programs for reducing this part of the data. All three of us shared
in the writing and editing of this book.
We would also like to mention that everything from the data collection to
the writing of this book was done by computer. There is not a single number
anywhere in any part of the data thiJ.t was generated, computed, reduced, copied,
averaged, printed, graphed, or manipulated by hand. Aside from the speed and
convenience of this approach, the principal advantage is the complete elimination
of several types of errors that may otherwise occur.
All of the airfoil polar data is available on 3~ or 5i inch IBM compatible
diskette from Fraser.
Sincere thanks go to Prof. Smits of the Princeton University Gas Dynamics
Laboratory for his enduring support while this extracurricular project began to
grow and consume seemingly endless hours of time away from the first two au-thors' regular thesis research. The gracious support of Prof. Lam and Prof. Cur-tiss of Princeton University, and the helpful discussions of Prof. Maughmer of
The Pennsylvania State University are appreciated. Thanks also go to Lou Piz-zarello who provided us with an air conditioner and new air intake filters for the
tunnel.
We are indebted to Ray Olsen for his many contributions at times when we
needed them most.
vi Airfoils at Low Speeds
For monetary contributions which made possible the purchase of important el-ements essential to this work we thank Rolf Girsberger, H.A. Stokely, Jerry Jack-son, Armin Saxer, Charles Griswald, C. Haverlan, H.J. Rogers, Preben Norholm,
Brian Smith, Thomas Yamokoski, and Trey Wood.
The expertise of many skilled model builders made the lengthy set-up stage
all worthwhile. In this respect we very deeply appreciate the work of Bob
Champine, Ron Wagner, Stan Watson, Mark Allen, Michael Bame, Tony Beck,
Woody Blanchard, Charles Fox, Peter Illick, Harley Michaelis, Forrest Miller,
Ted Off, Mike Reed, Tyson Sawyer, Chuck Anderson, Norman Anderson, Jerry
Arana, Bruce Baker, Ken Bates, David Batey Jr., Rich Border, John Boren,
Mike Chiddick, Doug Dorton, Roger Egginton, Dale Folkening, Harlan Halsey,
John Hohensee, Dave Jones, Stan Koch, Terry Luckenbach, Carl Mohs, Lee Mur-ray, Mark Nankivil, R.J. Ostrander, Jef Raskin, Les Rogers, Joe Ruminski, and
Karl Widiner.
Prof. Mark Drela of M.I.T. is gratefully acknowledged for making his ISES
computer code available to aid in the analysis of the new airfoil designs. Finally,
MKS Instruments, Inc. and Scientific Solutions, Inc. are acknowledged for their
valuable contributions of instrumentation.
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