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Old May 23, 2003, 04:01 AM
NONE
Guest
n/a Posts
New to 2m gliders, I have a question about my 2m Aspire.

I bought a 2m RTF Hangar 9 Aspire. Thought it would be a good
trainer for me to begin with.

The first time I flew it all went well, landed ok, couldnt get any
thermals though.

The second time it was a little more wind, as I got higher above the
high treeline it was very windy up there, the glider pretty much stood
still even with power full on. I tried to cross cutt the wind but
was getting farther and farther away from me so I had to bring it down
hard which broke one wing in a small spot. I just bought an ARF
Aspire on Ebay for 50 bucks so I can use it for extra parts.

How do you handle higher wind conditions like that with a glider that
cant seem to handle it? "The Speeds" Do you add weight? If so how
much? or should I not fly it on a day like that, I see pictures of
people flying in what appears to be high winds.


Any help please.


Old May 23, 2003, 04:01 AM
MSu1049321
Guest
n/a Posts
Re: New to 2m gliders, I have a question about my 2m Aspire.

Anything over 25 MPH is going to be a problem for a polyhedral trainer type
plane. You have to know about gradients too: when it's blowing 10 on the
ground, I mean at six feet where your nose is, up 50 feet higher, the wind is
blowing harder, higher, harder still. When the winds get like that, i get out
my RC sailboat instead. I'd get a slope plane, but it's all flat where i
live;-) You can fly in higher winds by ballasting up, adding weight at the CG
point so as not to change the trim too much. You fly faster, and landing
downwind, your sink rate will be higher, could lead to very hot landings and
damage. Your choices as a beginner are to get an EPP plane like maybe a Zagi
that can survive the thrashing of high wind action, or a more aerodynamically
slick plane, with ailerons and a flat, thin wing, that can penetrate the wind
and fly at higher wing loadings, blasting thru turbulence. This implies a ship
bigger than 2 meters., and they are both more difficult to fly and more
expensive.
Old May 23, 2003, 04:01 AM
NONE
Guest
n/a Posts
Re: New to 2m gliders, I have a question about my 2m Aspire.

Thanks for the info. A larger plane would be nice after i'm more
skilled but it's very hilly here "the Berkshires" I fly in fields on
large hills, a faster glider might not take the landings too well
since there not groomed at all, lots of sticks, small trees, last
years very hard hay type of grass on the ground no smooth places to
speak of to land. Guess i'm stuck with this type of glider. I'm
really enjoying it though, lots of fun I wish more people around here
were doing it.



On 23 May 2003 02:37:14 GMT, msu1049321@aol.com (MSu1049321) wrote:

>Anything over 25 MPH is going to be a problem for a polyhedral trainer type
>plane. You have to know about gradients too: when it's blowing 10 on the
>ground, I mean at six feet where your nose is, up 50 feet higher, the wind is
>blowing harder, higher, harder still. When the winds get like that, i get out
>my RC sailboat instead. I'd get a slope plane, but it's all flat where i
>live;-) You can fly in higher winds by ballasting up, adding weight at the CG
>point so as not to change the trim too much. You fly faster, and landing
>downwind, your sink rate will be higher, could lead to very hot landings and
>damage. Your choices as a beginner are to get an EPP plane like maybe a Zagi
>that can survive the thrashing of high wind action, or a more aerodynamically
>slick plane, with ailerons and a flat, thin wing, that can penetrate the wind
>and fly at higher wing loadings, blasting thru turbulence. This implies a ship
>bigger than 2 meters., and they are both more difficult to fly and more
>expensive.


Old May 25, 2003, 04:02 AM
Craig
Guest
n/a Posts
Re: New to 2m gliders, I have a question about my 2m Aspire.

If you have mountains you could take it to a slope and fly for hours
with a 25mph wind.

Try this for more info http://fatlion.com/sailplanes/sailplanes.html

Craig

NONE wrote:
> I bought a 2m RTF Hangar 9 Aspire. Thought it would be a good
> trainer for me to begin with.
>
> The first time I flew it all went well, landed ok, couldnt get any
> thermals though.
>
> The second time it was a little more wind, as I got higher above the
> high treeline it was very windy up there, the glider pretty much stood
> still even with power full on. I tried to cross cutt the wind but
> was getting farther and farther away from me so I had to bring it down
> hard which broke one wing in a small spot. I just bought an ARF
> Aspire on Ebay for 50 bucks so I can use it for extra parts.
>
> How do you handle higher wind conditions like that with a glider that
> cant seem to handle it? "The Speeds" Do you add weight? If so how
> much? or should I not fly it on a day like that, I see pictures of
> people flying in what appears to be high winds.
>
>
> Any help please.
>
>


Old May 25, 2003, 04:02 AM
NONE
Guest
n/a Posts
Re: New to 2m gliders, I have a question about my 2m Aspire.

Most all of the mountains are heavely wooded noplace to land. I fly
on a good size hill constant breeze coming up over it, but out of the
blue it gets real gusty maybe 40-45 mph winds can come up pretty fast
up here. I live in the next to the highest hill town in Mass "Savoy"
people around here call it God's Country, pretty far out of the way.
Deer, Moose, Bob Cat, Bear, Coy Dogs but i'm the only glider I'ver
ever seen up here. HA!


On Fri, 23 May 2003 16:09:58 GMT, Craig <brewer007BRA@yahoo.com>
wrote:

>If you have mountains you could take it to a slope and fly for hours
>with a 25mph wind.
>
>Try this for more info http://fatlion.com/sailplanes/sailplanes.html
>
>Craig
>
>NONE wrote:
>> I bought a 2m RTF Hangar 9 Aspire. Thought it would be a good
>> trainer for me to begin with.
>>
>> The first time I flew it all went well, landed ok, couldnt get any
>> thermals though.
>>
>> The second time it was a little more wind, as I got higher above the
>> high treeline it was very windy up there, the glider pretty much stood
>> still even with power full on. I tried to cross cutt the wind but
>> was getting farther and farther away from me so I had to bring it down
>> hard which broke one wing in a small spot. I just bought an ARF
>> Aspire on Ebay for 50 bucks so I can use it for extra parts.
>>
>> How do you handle higher wind conditions like that with a glider that
>> cant seem to handle it? "The Speeds" Do you add weight? If so how
>> much? or should I not fly it on a day like that, I see pictures of
>> people flying in what appears to be high winds.
>>
>>
>> Any help please.
>>
>>


Old May 25, 2003, 04:03 AM
reg
Guest
n/a Posts
Re: New to 2m gliders, I have a question about my 2m Aspire.

In article <cg5rcv4qc17rdb90ttaommgvjreuv201po@4ax.com>, NONE wrote:
> Thanks for the info. A larger plane would be nice after i'm more
> skilled but it's very hilly here "the Berkshires" I fly in fields on
> large hills, a faster glider might not take the landings too well
> since there not groomed at all, lots of sticks, small trees, last
> years very hard hay type of grass on the ground no smooth places to
> speak of to land. Guess i'm stuck with this type of glider.


Don't know what your glider is like. Hope the following info is of
some help.
I fly off slopes in the N.W of England, right on the coast.
I fly off slopes which are covered in heather, rocks, tufted grass,
sheep ! and some of the ones I use, depending on wind direction,
have virtually no level surfaces which are big enough to land on.

For wind speeds up to 15-17mph I use a 100 inch wingspan glider
which has rudder and elevator control. This is a relaxing model
to fly and because it is a floater it can be brought down gently
on relatively small landing areas.

For windy days 17 mph++ and slopes which are very rough I use a
zagi SI. I have had the zagi for 2 years and it has survived tremendous
abuse ! If you are just starting out in slope flying I would suggest
you get a zagi... it will enable you to fly under conditions and off
slopes which would wreck a balsa model. The zagi will enable you to
gain flying skills and they are also a lot of fun to fly.
It was so windy today that I ended up fastening 3/4 lb of fishing
weights to the zagi in order to get it to penetrate out into the wind.
It flew very well despite having 3/4 lb lead fastened underneath it !
I taught myself to fly a model plane by using the zagi, it kept me
going while I built the 100 inch model from a kit.

For speed, better penetration and a more efficient model then you
could consider a fully aerobatic slope soarer. This will probably
have a semi symmetrical wing section. I have recently built one
with a wingspan of 68 inches. Although fast and very manouverable
it also takes a lot more skill to fly it. I am still learning how to
lose energy and speed when coming in to land. Flying it is easy it
is just the bit where I want it to gracefully contact the ground again
that is a problem >:-) You don't want one of these until you
have acquired some skills and knowledge on your local slopes.

Good luck with the flying, take it steadily, fly in lighter wind
conditions until you gain some experience. In the early learning stages
it is sooooo easy to lose control in strong, blustery wind conditions.
Consider what will be the best models to progress with on your local
slopes.

Regards,
Reg

 


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