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Old Nov 11, 2011, 05:11 PM
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Oregon
Joined Oct 2008
874 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by pompebled View Post
Hi xx29l9,

As result of the rather steep propshaft angle, the answer to that question may very well turn out to be: "yes".

Installing too much power will push the bow down (or the stern up) making the boat run very wet and slow, while the motor will draw a lot of amps.

I only just stumbled upon your build, otherwise I'would have warned you (much) earlier.

Going fast with a modelboat requires a propshaft angle that's as shallow as possible.
This means either using a very long shaft, and the motor way up front under the foredeck, or using a flexshaft, which will allow you to run the shaft parallel to the keelline.

My personal objection to using a flexshaft in a semi scale model is the necessity to pull the flexshaft after every day of running the boat, to dry it and re-grease it.
Failing to do so will cause the shaft to rust solid in a matter of weeks...(or days, if you're running in salt water).

Regards, Jan.
Hi Jan-
Well...I hope the scale hull performs close to the 1:1 hull. I'm not looking to set any FE speed type records with this model, but I think I should be able to hit 15-20mph with the right combination of motor/prop. The shaft angle on the model turned out to be the same as the 1:1 due to space constraints. The 1:1 boat is no speed demon either considering the horsepower it has. It's geared and propped to pull people out of the water and get to wakeboard/water skiing speed quickly, not high top end. I look forward to water trials (someday) and see how this all works out. The boat is really light and I will have lots of room to move weight around and it will probably take a fair amount to put it at the proper waterline. Thanks for looking and helping me pay attention.
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