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        "1/2a"

#1 rob dahlbo Feb 28, 2002 09:59 AM

"1/2a"
 
Can someone please explain what the term 1/2A means? Thanks

#2 Viper Pilot Feb 28, 2002 11:02 AM

Back in the "Good Ole Days" planes were classified by the motor displacement used.
Class A had 0.1 cubic inch motors.
Planes powered by 0.05 ci motors then became 1/2A.
This is a good size plane for converting to e-power.

#3 Andy W Mar 01, 2002 06:30 AM

.. in the e-world, it generally refers to speed-400 class LMR gliders..
..a

#4 Valid8r Oct 11, 2004 06:37 AM

You've got my curiosity up now... I used to fly the old .049 control line planes as a kid, were/are those 1/2A then or something else???

Jon

#5 WebWolf Oct 11, 2004 06:40 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Valid8r
You've got my curiosity up now... I used to fly the old .049 control line planes as a kid, were/are those 1/2A then or something else???

Jon

No that just had to be 49/1000A ;)

#6 Andy W Oct 11, 2004 06:59 AM

Actually, I believe that would be correct..
..a

#7 50+AirYears Oct 12, 2004 05:00 PM

For purposes of competition, the AMA, and probably the FAI internationally, considers class 1/2 A to run from 0.000 ci to 0.050 ci, class A from 0.051 to 0.200 ci, 0.201 to 0.300 ci as class B, 0.301 to 0.400 as class C, and 0.401 to 0.670 as class D. These divisions are why you used to see things like some mfgs putting out an .049 and an .051, a .19 and a .201 or .21, and the Johnson and Veco companies had a .29 and .31 or.32. When Free flight was the major competitive category, these size splits would allow a flyer to compete in two classes with the same plane by changing engines. The two displacements would have almost exactly the same weight and performance, so the engines could be swapped without any major readjustments.


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