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        Discussion Is there a way to keep the fuel off the plane in flight?

#1 cloud_9 Feb 12, 2013 10:54 AM

Is there a way to keep the fuel off the plane in flight?
 
I'm being instructed with a nitro Hangar 9 Alpha (Evolution .46). It's really fun to fly and I like the engine a lot, it's more like the IC engines I have always loved in motorcycles, cars, etc.

But man when I pick up that plane after it lands, it is covered in nitro gas/oil. I'm getting used to it...but still I wonder, why don't people put an extension or a hose or something on the muffler that exits the fuel away from the plane? A six inch hose to the side would do it maybe. Or a hose exiting the fuel at the back by the horizontal stab. Or at least make mufflers that point away from the plane instead of directly at it? If I could avoid having a plane covered in the fuel, it's be lots easier to say goodbye to electric...

Thanks,
Jim

#2 whiskykid Feb 12, 2013 11:00 AM

fly faster!

#3 F16DCC Feb 12, 2013 11:06 AM

I had the same aircraft and I turned the muffler tip to the ground and bought a DuBro exhaust deflector and pointed it under the fuse. This way all the oil wil coat the bottom of the aircraft and not spray everywhere.

#4 grosbeak Feb 12, 2013 11:08 AM

They do sell muffler extensions:

http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8236/8...19c840cd_z.jpg

It helps you choose which part of your plane to slime. I suspect that a really long extension would result in too much back pressure.

#5 kenh3497 Feb 12, 2013 11:31 AM

I use the extensions like grosbeak has pictured. Turn the muffler outlet if possible and point the extension in the most favorable direction to keep the slime off the plane. Before you put the extension on clean it and the muffler outlet VERY well with a good degreaser. If the muffler is oily, there is a better chance of loosing the extension.

As insurance I have been using a triangle shaped file and filing a groove around the muffler outlet. Make the groove so it has a 90 degree edge towards the rear opening of the outlet and it tapers away to nothing in the other direction. This makes a hose barb and will grip the extension better.

Ken

#6 ChillPhatCat Feb 12, 2013 11:38 AM

You'll never be able to keep it off the plane, but yeah you can point it to where you want it to get slimed at least.

#7 Zor Feb 12, 2013 01:24 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by cloud_9 (Post 24112617)
I'm being instructed with a nitro Hangar 9 Alpha (Evolution .46). It's really fun to fly and I like the engine a lot, it's more like the IC engines I have always loved in motorcycles, cars, etc.

But man when I pick up that plane after it lands, it is covered in nitro gas/oil. I'm getting used to it...but still I wonder, why don't people put an extension or a hose or something on the muffler that exits the fuel away from the plane? A six inch hose to the side would do it maybe. Or a hose exiting the fuel at the back by the horizontal stab. Or at least make mufflers that point away from the plane instead of directly at it? If I could avoid having a plane covered in the fuel, it's be lots easier to say goodbye to electric...

Thanks,
Jim

Jim,

As you see there is ways of diminishing the exposure.

I am glad "you are getting used to it".
It takes only a few minutes between flights or at the end of the flying day.

Zor

#8 scootrb4 Feb 13, 2013 03:04 AM

Friend of mine uses a piece of fuel line to extend the exhaust pipe down and away from the fuse. This actually attaches to the fixed landing gear and this really minimizes the mess on the plane.
You could experiment with something like that?

#9 chuebner Feb 13, 2013 06:02 AM

5 Attachment(s)
If possible I try and mount my engines horizontally so the exhaust exits out the bottom of the fuselage. Add an exhaust deflector and the residue is held to a bare minimum.

I have also extended the exhaust down to the landing gear on vertically installed engines with success. I use an exhaust deflector with a large aluminum tube stuck in the end and attached to the landing gear. A bit unsightly but virtually eliminates the slime.

#10 MikeCr Feb 13, 2013 06:05 AM

Sure there is. Fly Electric!

Sorry, couldn't resist!:D


Mike

#11 dmrcflyr2 Feb 13, 2013 06:51 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MikeCr (Post 24121118)
Sure there is. Fly Electric!

Sorry, couldn't resist!:D


Mike

Beat me to it. Hey if you don't embrace the fuel residue and enjoy the smell then glow flying is not for you. Go to electrics. That is the only 100% guarantee to never deal with residue/smell ever again.

Life is too short to have ANY part of a pleasurable hobby be a nuisance or annoyance.

#12 MikeCr Feb 13, 2013 07:50 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dmrcflyr2 (Post 24121348)
Beat me to it. Hey if you don't embrace the fuel residue and enjoy the smell then glow flying is not for you. Go to electrics. That is the only 100% guarantee to never deal with residue/smell ever again.

Life is too short to have ANY part of a pleasurable hobby be a nuisance or annoyance.

I'd be lying if I said that the slimy residue wasn't at least part of the reason I went to electric but it wasn't the main reason. There are ways to minimize the problem and of course everyone has their favorite cleaner formula to clean the goo off, some work better than others.

I believe you mentioned a hose to the back of the plane, not gonna work. Way back when during the time that slimers and gassers were the only only game in town, a guy in my club used a hose from the muffler to the LG down by the wheel. It worked OK for him. Others tried it and had severe overheating problems due to the tube. And this was a tube only 6 or 8 inches long.

For me the switch to electric eliminated so many of the glow engine headaches I can't even list them all. The last jug of glow fuel I bought was probably back in 2007 maybe and when I looked at what they get for it now I almost had a heart attack!

But as they say, to each his own. I did my time with glow (since the sixties) and now I've moved on. I have to admit I do still like the sound of an engine (any kind of engine) but my present club has strict sound level rules and while glow engines (with a good muffler) don't seem to be a problem, gas engines without some form of cannister muffler are out of the question.



Mike

#13 dmrcflyr2 Feb 13, 2013 09:44 AM

I just got back in after a 6 year layoff. Tried electrics since that is what 90% at my local field fly, but it just didn't 'do it' for me. Now selling everything electric I bought and won't go back. I love that 'nitro cologne'. Plus I fly mainly 4-strokes and they do not generate as much residue, but hey, its all part of the experience.

#14 F16DCC Feb 13, 2013 10:40 AM

IMHO if you don't like the sound and smell of nitro or gas engines then you probably drive a Prius.........

#15 Chip01 Feb 13, 2013 11:19 AM

Oil residue is part and parcle of using our little methanol engines. The simplistic engine uses the "Lost Lubrication" method of lubricating the engine. So some of the oil is going to past completely through the engine, which is not a bad thing in that it removes some of the latent heat generated with it. Other issues such as lubricating the ends of the connecting rod means we need a lot of oil. Gas engines, do not need as much oil as there is some inherent lubrication in gasoline and the use of needle bearings on the bottom end of the connecting rod. Even so there is always some residue from a basic lost lubrication engine, gas or alcohol powered, but less so from gasoline engines because less is used overall.

So it is not trite to say, if you really dislike the clean up of the oil, go electric. I do not think it is the same, the odor, the smell of Castor, is attractive to me. So fuels even have some scent added to them. The use of all synthetic oils will lessen the amount of residue and a compromise is to use the blended fuels. Castor is your best friend for longevity but its combustion temperature is generally higher tmperature than that found in the alcohol fueled engines.


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