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        Cool Catching a thermal with a paper plane!

#1 flyzguy Nov 15, 2012 01:33 AM

Catching a thermal with a paper plane!
 
Caught on video! I was so pleased with this flight and delighted my friend got it in 1080p.
Mt Hough Paper Plane Flight (0 min 43 sec)

#2 draganbt Nov 15, 2012 05:27 AM

That was an amazing flight!

Ever since preschool I've been playing with paper planes, still havent caught a thermal like that :)

Thanks for sharing the video.

Is that Takyo Toda's SkyKing btw?

#3 Jon Snow Nov 15, 2012 06:40 AM

:DBrilliant-now do it again:popcorn:
Stuart

#4 BMatthews Nov 15, 2012 10:47 AM

Given where you are flying I'd suggest that it was some slope lift rather than a thermal.

Still a great flight for a paper free flighter. Did you manage to get any more flights that rode the lift?

#5 GliderJim Nov 15, 2012 09:41 PM

Nice of it to come right back like that.

#6 weather_man Nov 16, 2012 04:52 AM

Awesome!

Great Job... that co@ky Bast@#$

#7 RPM314 Nov 16, 2012 02:58 PM

Nice!:cool: That happened to me once (in the city), except it just gained 10 feet and ended up on someone's roof.

How do you make that model? Name? I gotta try it.

#8 flyzguy Jan 08, 2013 09:09 PM

Its definitely a sky king derivative. I didn't have tape so I used a design with locking folds. A Nakamura lock also works, among others. The type of plane is not too important IMO, getting the basics right for outdoor flying are: lots of pitch stability, fast trim, lots of luck ;)

The wind was basically 0, with prevailing winds from behind the slope (reason I did not fly my hang glider) and thermal flow UP the slope in cycles.

I have some slope soaring paper airplane video I might upload later if I can find it...

#9 John O'Sullivan Jan 09, 2013 03:44 PM

With all due respects you should attribute this flight to the presence of slope lift rather than any thermal activity. A paper or plastic bag will rise in slope lift.

#10 Pete1978 Jan 10, 2013 01:12 AM

Of all of the hundreds, if not thousands of paper aeroplanes I made as a boy, only twice did I manage to fling them into thermals from a flat field launch and only one of those went OOS.

I was trimming it for a school paper aeroplane competion when I can't have been much more than nine. It was with a strange mixture of awed amazement and disappointment that I watched my prize flyer disappearing up, up and away. Thankfully it was quickly replaced, I managed to win the competition and spend a day (with a few runners up) at RAF Scampton talking to the Red Arrows pilots before watching them practice from the edge on the runway. A good day out!

#11 flyzguy Jan 10, 2013 01:59 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by John O'Sullivan (Post 23763588)
With all due respects you should attribute this flight to the presence of slope lift rather than any thermal activity. A paper or plastic bag will rise in slope lift.

Nope. Trust me. As an RC slope flyer and hang glider pilot as well as an experienced thermal RC sailplane pilot, I can tell you that this was a thermal flight. For slope lift to work you need prevailing wind coming up the slope. In this case, the prevailing wind was blowing down the slope, which is why I was flying paper airplanes instead of my hang glider.

#12 flyzguy Jan 10, 2013 02:03 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Pete1978 (Post 23768736)
Of all of the hundreds, if not thousands of paper aeroplanes I made as a boy, only twice did I manage to fling them into thermals from a flat field launch and only one of those went OOS.

That's awesome. Ive never had a flatland thermal flight go OOS with a paper plane. Knew a guy who claimed to have lost a parachute army guy to a monster thermal. It's always magical, especially as a kid, when the rule "what goes up must come down" is apparently put on hold :)

#13 BMatthews Jan 10, 2013 01:47 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by flyzguy (Post 23756337)
....The wind was basically 0, with prevailing winds from behind the slope (reason I did not fly my hang glider) and thermal flow UP the slope in cycles....

Like John I was thinking that it was a bit of slope lift too. But given this last bit it sure sounds like it was a thermal thing....

As for losing a paper glider and other things? Well there's thermals and then there are THERMALS ! ! ! ! I've lost two models over the years that were in DT mode that went OOS out overhead and downwind simply because the thermals were so strong that the sink rate during DT mode wasn't strong enough to even make much of a difference. So hearing that someone lost a plastic soldier guy on a home made parachute isn't out of the question at all. But it still makes the ol' lower jaw sag to see it happen.... :D

Mind you a good flying paper model should be able to hook a normal thermal and fly away. The trick is getting them to launch high enough to get out of the ground clutter turbulence and up into the capture zone. That would typically suggest that it needs to get up around 12 to 15 feet where it can get sucked up. Once it's on it's way the hard work is done and you can sit back and watch.... assuming it doesn't get spit out the side... :D

#14 dayhead Jan 11, 2013 09:18 PM

Sometimes while on launch waiting for conditions to improve I'll make gliders from paper or foam, get 'em trimmed right, then using masking tape I attach them to the side wires of my HG.
Later on when I hook a thermal I'll release one and fly around with it. Every once in a while they'll out climb me.
One time I released about a dozen Sling Wings all at once in a thermal from my HG. Fun!

#15 TLyttle Jan 11, 2013 10:52 PM

When I was a kid, I used to get to the observation tower on the highest building in town (11 storeys) with a pad of typewriter paper under my jacket and spend most of an afternoon folding and flying. The streets and other building roofs would fairly well guarantee oos flights for most of them...


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