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        Discussion Congressman draws fire for calling evolution, Big Bang ‘lies from the pit of hell’

#1 DenverJayhawk Oct 10, 2012 10:10 PM

Congressman draws fire for calling evolution, Big Bang ‘lies from the pit of hell’
 
How do these neanderthals get into Congress? It's really scary to think he has constituents. Almost as moronic as the self abortion theory under legitimate rape.

http://religion.blogs.cnn.com/2012/1...ell/?hpt=hp_t2

#2 schrederman Oct 10, 2012 10:12 PM

Aaaaahhhh...... another Christian bashing thread... er... troll...

#3 DenverJayhawk Oct 10, 2012 10:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by schrederman (Post 22968595)
Aaaaahhhh...... another Christian bashing thread... er... troll...

believe it or not, i'm a christian. I just happen to have a brain too.

#4 logan5 Oct 10, 2012 10:17 PM

People have often forgoten that some of our most important early scientific discoveries were done by men of the cloth.

There is room in science for religion and there is room in religion for science.

#5 LcJ Oct 10, 2012 10:19 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DenverJayhawk (Post 22968610)
believe it or not, i'm a christian. I just happen to have a brain too.

Well I am a Christian and therein lies the difference.:D

#6 California Condor Oct 10, 2012 10:44 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by LcJ (Post 22968653)
Well I am a Christian and therein lies the difference.:D

That's a good one LcJ.

#7 AustinTatious Oct 10, 2012 11:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by logan5 (Post 22968636)
People have often forgoten that some of our most important early scientific discoveries were done by men of the cloth.

There is room in science for religion and there is room in religion for science.

people also tend to forget that men of the cloth or religion is responsible for decades of scientific oppression and all sorts of atrocities.

why is it when science doesn't prove what religious people want it to they attack it. I'll lay you odds that if some scientific evidence surfaced that proved god that they would be the first ones to embrace it.

#8 AustinTatious Oct 10, 2012 11:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by logan5 (Post 22968636)

There is room in science for religion and there is room in religion for science.


no no no..... that is a silly statement. what you are suggesting is that there is room in science for something with absolutely no scientific proof or legitimacy of any kind.... pretty much the antithesis of science.

#9 downunder Oct 11, 2012 12:58 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by schrederman (Post 22968595)
Aaaaahhhh...... another Christian bashing thread... er... troll...

I disagree, this isn't bashing Christians as a whole but it's certainly pointing out the idiotic beliefs that some Christians have and when one of them is in a position of some power and actually serves on the House Committee on Science, Space and Technology, well....you gotta wonder.

Of course, as a politician giving a speech at a Baptist banquet, maybe he was lying through his teeth and just telling them what they like to hear :). Get them votes any way you can....

#10 stone_axe Oct 11, 2012 01:19 AM

There is room in science for religion and there is room in religion for science.

You need to check your history because almost all of the great Western scientists; Galileo, Copernicus, Kepler and Newton were educated in Catholic schools or were priests themselves.

It is true that their findings were refuted by the papacy and Galileo had to recant his findings on his deathbed in order for his children to continue to receive his substantial stipend from the Catholic Church.

While Europe was in the Dark Age the Catholic Church spent huge amounts of money to create an advanced education system, sought out top minds and paid them large amounts of money to study science. That system brought us Galileo, Copernicus, Kepler and Newton. That system brought us our current cosmology and the laws of physics that took America to the moon.

You can't just say that Christianity is the enemy of science when they went to such great expense to foster the greatest scientists in the world.

Idiots that use a literal translation of the Christian Bible have no business discussing science if they don't understand the history of Christianity.

#11 AustinTatious Oct 11, 2012 01:46 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by stone_axe (Post 22969677)
There is room in science for religion and there is room in religion for science.

You need to check your history because almost all of the great Western scientists; Galileo, Copernicus, Kepler and Newton were educated in Catholic schools or were priests themselves.

It is true that their findings were refuted by the papacy and Galileo had to recant his findings on his deathbed in order for his children to continue to receive his substantial stipend from the Catholic Church.

While Europe was in the Dark Age the Catholic Church spent huge amounts of money to create an advanced education system, sought out top minds and paid them large amounts of money to study science. That system brought us Galileo, Copernicus, Kepler and Newton. That system brought us our current cosmology and the laws of physics that took America to the moon.

You can't just say that Christianity is the enemy of science when they went to such great expense to foster the greatest scientists in the world.

Idiots that use a literal translation of the Christian Bible have no business discussing science if they don't understand the history of Christianity.

so In other words, unless you twist what the bible says so as to suit ones own sensibilities and reconsile differences with modern science, you are an idiot...

interesting. Why read the book only to twist it in the first place?

and BTW, just because some great people were following the mainstream religion of the time (when to not do so would be heracy) that doesn't lend any credence to the religion.

#12 stone_axe Oct 11, 2012 02:34 AM

It's called critical thinking. Plato first came up with the notion of critical thinking and it is the basis of all science.

If you read Plato's writings today they can seem as bizarre as any ancient religious text does today. He put fish in a bucket and then killed them to see if life had (what 4,000 years later we now call) mass. That was pretty radical stuff in a culture that thought Zeus came from the heavens and Atlas held up the world.

You can't apply your modern perspective to the ancient world and make fair comparisons.

I think you will find DesCartes work to be interesting as you seem to have similar views. Besides being one of the great mathematicians that invented the X and Y coordinate system - the Cartesian plane - he was also a great philosopher. As if creating the basis of graphs and television/computer graphics wasn't enough he came up with, "Cogito ergo sum", I think therefore I am - the basis of modern philosophy.

Perhaps if you study some science and philosophy it will not be so hard to see how they are related to each other.

#13 Norman Adlam Oct 11, 2012 03:33 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by logan5 (Post 22968636)
People have often forgoten that some of our most important early scientific discoveries were done by men of the cloth.

There is room in science for religion and there is room in religion for science.

Well said, logan5! :D

#14 ENGINETORQUE Oct 11, 2012 04:33 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DenverJayhawk (Post 22968610)
believe it or not, i'm a christian. I just happen to have a brain too.

You sound like an intersting man indeed :D

#15 ENGINETORQUE Oct 11, 2012 04:34 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by LcJ (Post 22968653)
Well I am a Christian and therein lies the difference.:D

Not sure if you're admitting to something (unwittingly...) that you didn't mean to here Lyle :confused::D:p:popcorn:


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