RC Groups

RC Groups
    UAV - Unmanned Aerial Vehicles
        Discussion Hobby Under Threat?

#1 lovegroove Oct 05, 2012 04:20 AM

Hobby Under Threat?
 
I'm doing a bit of research for a new article that I'm writing for my blog. I just wanted to here from guys on here about how new legislation is affecting them or even if you actually know what the current regulations are where you live.

http://drone-pilot.blogspot.fr/

Do you have a light UAS licence?

Are some organisations creating a monopoly of the market of certification and licensing?

Should the average hobbyist be subject to the same regulations being brought in to control military/commercial drones?

What is your national model flying association doing to protect your rights?

Have you been caught on the wrong side of the law?

Cheers,

LG

#2 RC Man Oct 05, 2012 04:59 AM

In the US the AMA is doing a fairly good job of looking out for the hobbits.


If you fly commercial long distance I really think that you need certification. I see a few videos that indicate there are some irresponsible people that need to be educated by a certification and licensing process. If they don’t shape up they will kill the hobby for all of us.


.

#3 patrickegan Oct 05, 2012 06:23 PM

AMA is working the issue. No flying beyond VLOS.

The commercial guys are going to get screwed.

http://www.blogtalkradio.com/suasnew.../03/the-jumble

The FAA keeps up with the obtuse "we are leading the way with airspace integration!"

Hours of podcasts about the subject including a conversation with Peter van Blyenburgh, President of UVS International which is headquartered in Paris.

http://www.blogtalkradio.com/suasnews

#4 RC Man Oct 06, 2012 07:11 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by patrickegan (Post 22923927)
AMA is working the issue. No flying beyond VLOS.

I just donít see how it would be safe to fly beyond visual range. I think that is a good rule and would not change that.


:rolleyes:

#5 patrickegan Oct 06, 2012 09:03 AM

Not saying that you should. In the commercial world, with the right mitigators it should be allowed. Just like France.

#6 Strathcona Oct 08, 2012 08:12 PM

In Canada you need a SFOC (Special flight Operation Certificate) issued by Transport Canada , you need first to send a full report about the flight, the flying site, who is the pilot in charge, the UAV specifications, the payload, the risk assessment, .... and most important a proof of liability insurance for the UAV (not so easy to have).
This certificate is valid for a site for a given time (you can ask a year long SFOC).
Here a link about the SFOC with an example of application:
http://diydrones.com/group/canada/fo...of-application

There is new regulations coming soon, you will need to have at least your Pilot Ground School + pass an exam specific to UAV, get your MAAC wing (RC licence), have your UAV registred, ....
the complete list of the change here:
http://www.unmannedsystems.ca/content.php?doc=193

#7 JohnAV8R Oct 11, 2012 10:23 AM

Sounds like modeling is going to become more and more complicated.
This might also be a good route for those flying 50 cc and up sized gas models. When I was a kid, flying U/C with a Space Hopper seemed like a big deal.
John, MAAC 5526

#8 lovegroove Oct 14, 2012 02:42 PM

I've bitten off more than I can chew with this article and find myself falling asleep trying to read the pages of legislation for different countries. Why are all the regulations not written in plain language that make it easy to understand. Half the time I just find them to be confusing and ambiguous.

#9 CenTexFlyer Oct 16, 2012 10:39 AM

Designed that way by lawmakers. The layman is not supposed to understand them. That is the way they maintain control, through ambiguity and the perceived potential of legal action.

#10 macboffin Oct 28, 2012 02:16 PM

Yeppers! Hence the Olde English Saying : "Bulls+++ baffles Brains"

#11 R_Lefebvre Nov 08, 2012 03:09 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by CenTexFlyer (Post 23016058)
Designed that way by lawmakers. The layman is not supposed to understand them. That is the way they maintain control, through ambiguity and the perceived potential of legal action.

Haha, case in point, this link shows only as "Access to this document is restricted."

http://www.unmannedsystems.ca/content.php?doc=193

#12 Strathcona Nov 08, 2012 05:08 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by R_Lefebvre (Post 23218427)
Haha, case in point, this link shows only as "Access to this document is restricted."

http://www.unmannedsystems.ca/content.php?doc=193

Well, You are not member of Unmanned Systems Canada !!! It's only 75$ / year for individual.
The annual conference is held in Ottawa until tomorrow. The future of the SFOC change was debated yesterday afternoon and the document on the link I give should be now in revision. I will give you news on the Canadian group of DIYDrones soon.

#13 R_Lefebvre Nov 09, 2012 09:47 AM

Oh wow, there's a conference on right now in Ottawa? Wish I'd known.

I'll love to see your update on what is happening.

I still don't agree that people should have to be a member of the organization in order to see a document that is a law. Secret laws?

Are the changes (such as requirement for ground pilot training) going to be grandfathered out? Is there an advantage to jumping in now before I'm ready, but before the new rules come into effect?

Well, my aircraft is now ready, but I wasn't ready to actually start a business just yet.

#14 Martin Y Nov 09, 2012 10:24 AM

I still don't agree that people should have(or forced) to be a member of the organization in order fly.

#15 Strathcona Nov 09, 2012 10:32 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by R_Lefebvre (Post 23225030)
Oh wow, there's a conference on right now in Ottawa? Wish I'd known.

I'll love to see your update on what is happening.

I still don't agree that people should have to be a member of the organization in order to see a document that is a law. Secret laws?

Are the changes (such as requirement for ground pilot training) going to be grandfathered out? Is there an advantage to jumping in now before I'm ready, but before the new rules come into effect?

Well, my aircraft is now ready, but I wasn't ready to actually start a business just yet.


Unmanned System Canada (USC) is a private organization working very closely with TC on the future of the UAS in Canada and who try to defend us (well more the interest of the industry) and help defining regulations that are not too restrictives.

The text is not a law just the explanation of the 4 phases of the new coming regulations. In summary , USC ,as TC didn't have the time/staff to wrote the new exam, will do this task and that what it was discussed 2 days ago at the conference.

According the plan, all the 4 phases of new regulations are to effective before 2018 (phase 1 before end of 2014).

For the ground school (GS) training, well if you ask for SFOC, usually TC is more happy when you have your PPL or GS , at least you know the CARs, how to read an aeronautical map, a NoTAM, the phraseology, well to summarize all the tools you need for a better integration in the airspace.

To attend the conference is not cheap between (700-1400$) but you have direct contact with industry, TC and maybe future clients. Start with a membership @ 75$.

Here a pdf from the working group march 2012 with some (old) news http://www.h-a-c.ca/UAV_REPORT.pdf


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:05 AM.