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        Build Log 1/8 Scale Sopwith Tabloid

#1 Lnagel Oct 01, 2012 06:24 PM

1/8 Scale Sopwith Tabloid
 
3 Attachment(s)
This is a prototype build of Peter Rake's design of the Sopwith Tabloid. The full size tabloid had a wingspan of 25.75 feet. At 1/8 scale that gives this model a wingspan of 38.5 inches. I'm anticipating a flying weight of 25 to 30 ounces. With that it should do well on a 100 watt motor such as an Eflight 400 or 450. I do happen to have a 450 on hand.

I've done a couple three prototype builds and for various reasons I decided not to do any more. But when I found out that Pete was paying his prototype builders 200 quid I hopped right on the band wagon. :D

The Tabloid was developed originally in 1913 as a civilian sport plane. In 1914 a float version won the Schneider Tropy Race. With the advent of WWI it was militarized. Tabloids were used for the first raid behind German lines. I've attached a couple of photos of the original.

Larry

#2 Lnagel Oct 01, 2012 06:39 PM

2 Attachment(s)
I started out with the fuselage. It is typical Rakian with a box forward portion made from 1/8" sheet stock and a built up aft section made from 1/8" square sticks. I learned from previous Rake builds to use strong wood for the aft fuselage longerons. In this case I used basswood. I have used it before for longerons and found that if is much stronger than balsa and the weight gain is negligible. After building two identical sides I added the reinforcing doublers for the center section struts and undercarriage (UC). The usual admonishment here, be sure to build a left and a right side. That is unless you are building the navy version. In that case be sure to build a port and starboard side. :)

Larry

#3 PETERRAKE Oct 01, 2012 07:24 PM

Larry,
I thought I told you to keep quiet about the 'bung'. (Brit slang for bribe, as in bung (throw) someone cash). I didn't mention when I 'd pay it though.

It'll be nice to get this one finished, I think it came as a bit of a shock to Hugh. Not by any means a difficult build though and those c/s struts make fitting the top wing really simple.

Pete

#4 trumps Oct 02, 2012 03:50 AM

A pretty little aeroplane to be sure, looking forward to following along. hopefully it will also spur Hugh on to finish his as well, it was pretty close to being completed from memory!

Cheers
Craig

#5 MerlinV Oct 02, 2012 04:39 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by trumps (Post 22890380)
A pretty little aeroplane to be sure, looking forward to following along. hopefully it will also spur Hugh on to finish his as well, it was pretty close to being completed from memory!

Cheers
Craig

Yes it is Craig.

Wheels have been threaded and I am ready to fit the UC.
The Wing fitment was never the problem Pete...
The problem was my inability to finish something.
A problem that I am seeking help for:)

Will watch this one with great interest.

Cheers,

Hugh

#6 floss Oct 02, 2012 04:52 AM

Always makes a nice looking model, must be that unique chisel shaped cowl. I remember Lakeflyer doing the float version a few years back, will be watching this one develop.

#7 Pat Lynch Oct 02, 2012 06:19 AM

Pete was paying his prototype builders 200 quid

Can I ask for back pay? Does the payment increase by the square of the scale increase? does the........nah - I do for the enjoyment. Who needs payment :p

We're all watching Larry :)

Pat

#8 PETERRAKE Oct 02, 2012 07:49 AM

Pat,
Yours will go in the post sometime in 2040, I'll even include interest. Larry's will be about five years after that.
Mind you, if I don't actually manage to get that dining room decorated (other things kept getting in the way - like a new column and devising things to put in it), I'll be lucky to make it to the end of this year.

Hugh,
No inferences intended mate, I just knew you'd said how much of a surprise it came to discover that skills don't always transfer as well as we'd like.

Pete

#9 portablevcb Oct 02, 2012 08:26 AM

You mean someone makes money in this hobby? Don't tell Vicki or she'll start making me pay her for all the cutting :)

#10 Lnagel Oct 02, 2012 08:44 AM

Ribs, ribs and more ribs
 
3 Attachment(s)
Thanks for tuning in guys.

I had to delay the fuselage portion of the build because I don't have any 1/8" ply needed for a couple of formers. So I am moving on to the wings.

Mainly because I am so mean that I make Ebenezer Scrooge look like a Las Vegas high roller I decided to eliminate the expense of laser cutting and decided to hand cut my own parts. Also because I already have all the wood I need Well, with the exception of the 1/8" ply which I will get in a couple of days when I go to the big city.

As in most plans builds, the most tedious part of cutting your own parts is the wing ribs. This plane has 48 full ribs, (32 1/16" thick and 16 1/8" thick) and 41 sub-ribs. Fortunately, this plane has a constant chord so all of the ribs are the same size. So I was able to cut all 48 of them using a template I made from 1/16" ply. Once I had 48 generic, stem cell, undifferentiated ribs I sliced them up and cut holes in them depending upon their specific locations in the wings. I used the aft portions of the ribs in the aileron area for the aileron ribs.

Cutting the sub-ribs was relatively easy, just time consuming. First I stripped a 5/8" wide strip from a sheet of 1/16" balsa. Then I cut that strip into 13/16" long sections. The 36" long strip was just long enough to give me 41 rectangle blanks for the 41 needed sub-ribs. I then used the same template I used for the full ribs to cut the rectangles to a shape that resembled a sub-rib.

Larry

#11 PETERRAKE Oct 02, 2012 01:58 PM

Isn't it great when you're having fun?

#12 Sopwith Mike Oct 02, 2012 03:21 PM

3 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by Lnagel (Post 22886934)
The Tabloid was developed originally in 1913 as a civilian sport plane. In 1914 a float version won the Schneider Tropy Race. With the advent of WWI it was militarized. Tabloids were used for the first raid behind German lines. I've attached a couple of photos of the original.

Larry

Hi Larry,

You've chosen an interesting Tabloid version to model, although the photo you added does not show lot of detail, it is clearly 1214, one of two aircraft built by Sopwiths for the 1914 Schneider Trophy race. 1214 was purchased for the RNAS and was fitted with a Lewis gun on the starboard side. I'm afraid it does indeed have uncovered wheels and in the photos (from the Tabloid Mini Datafile) you can see: the carburettor air intake on both sides of the fuselage, the way the gun is mounted, the small windscreen on the starboard side of the cockpit coaming, the headrest, the unusual cooling cut-outs on the upper cowl, the steel wedges on the propeller (a scale feature even the most fervid modeller would baulk at) and most difficult of all perhaps, the radically reduced size of the fin and rudder.

Sopwith seems to have had a "thing" about reducing the size of fins and rudders and you can see this trait on a number of his designs. Perhaps Hawker was such a skilled pilot he did not need a larger control surface?

You can also see the markings, which seem to be non-standard red/white/blue on the upper and lower surfaces of the wings, as well as the fuselage. The stripes on the rudder are not the same though - perhaps they are blue/white/blue? The "1214" serial is parallel to the lower longeron. You can also see how obvious the rib tapes are.

All in all, a very ideosyncratic prototype! Almost every Tabloid differed from the next one, some so radically as to be unrecognisable. There are easier version to model, and if you were prepared to consider one of the flying replicas, I could point you at one with ailerons!

You will have gathered I am an enthusiast and have made three or four Tabloids of my own - the very best wishes for this build, and I look forward to seeing it fly - with or without the interrupter wedges on the propellor!

#13 Lnagel Oct 02, 2012 07:42 PM

Mike, thanks for the great information on 1214. But, I may have chosen poorly. The major problem I see with 1214 is that I can detect no ailerons in any of the photos. Pete's model has ailerons, so it would probably be prudent of me to choose another subject. Do you happen to have any cockpit detail?

Larry

#14 MerlinV Oct 02, 2012 09:33 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Lnagel (Post 22897417)
Mike, thanks for the great information on 1214. But, I may have chosen poorly. The major problem I see with 1214 is that I can detect no ailerons in any of the photos. Pete's model has ailerons, so it would probably be prudent of me to choose another subject. Do you happen to have any cockpit detail?

Larry

Exactly my issue. And the Serial on the 3 view that Pete posted on my thread was in fact for a Bristol Type C Scout... So my build doesn't have a Serial, not even a made up one.

In fact, I can find no particular machine that sports Ailerons, Raked interplane struts, and the "Racing" Undercarriage as indicated in the three view.

Nevertheless, I think I got my spoked uncovered wheels right:)

There may be a photo somewhere on the interweb showing the cockpit details of a Sopwith Baby? That might suffice as a template.

Cheers,

Hugh

#15 Sopwith Mike Oct 03, 2012 02:41 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Lnagel (Post 22897417)
Mike, thanks for the great information on 1214. But, I may have chosen poorly. The major problem I see with 1214 is that I can detect no ailerons in any of the photos. Pete's model has ailerons, so it would probably be prudent of me to choose another subject. Do you happen to have any cockpit detail?

Larry

Thee were no Tabloids of his type with ailerons. Only the SS3 Tabloids had them, and it would be a big conversion (outside Peter's remit, I expect) to do a conversion.

I just used the cockpit detail from a Pup:) - but a Baby or Schneider would be better.


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