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        Mini-HowTo Tutorial: How to use a servo board as a brushed ESC or variable brightness LED switch

#1 x5252x Aug 20, 2012 06:44 PM

Tutorial: How to use a servo board as a brushed ESC or variable brightness LED switch
 
Tutorial: How to use a servo board as a brushed ESC or variable brightness LED switch

I often see people asking about brushed ESCs, mainly for very small micro RC cars around 1/64 scale, and also people wanting to be able to turn LED lights on and off, vary their brightness, and control other things from their transmitter. However there does not seem to be a comprehensive guide on how to use a servo board to achieve these results, which is actually a very cheap and effective method.

A few people have touched on the subject, and briefly mentioned how it can be done, but I thought I would make this guide to help people out.

Step 1: Find yourself a servo
You can use any servo that you have, the larger servos will be able to handle higher powered motors, but for all of my purposes I have found that a cheap $3 servo from eBay is perfect.

This is the one I will be using in this guide, a cheap 9g micro servo.

http://images.mobile.eu.org/upload/167165443.jpg

Step 2: Take the servo apart
It should be pretty easy to figure out how they come apart.

http://images.mobile.eu.org/upload/16716572.jpg

This one has 4 screws, but other servos will be different.

http://images.mobile.eu.org/upload/167165730.jpg

Step 3: Find the centre point of the servo
The easiest way to do this is to connect it to a receiver and turn it on. Do not worry if you cannot do this step, it just makes it a bit easier.

http://images.mobile.eu.org/upload/16717627.jpg

Step 4: Find out what resistors you need
To do this you need to have a multimeter to measure the resistance of the existing pot.

Firstly, locate where the 3 pot wires are connected to the board.

http://images.mobile.eu.org/upload/167171121.jpg

Set your multimeter to measure resistance, I set mine to 20K as most servo pots will be around 5K.

http://images.mobile.eu.org/upload/167171412.jpg

Now test the middle point with one of the outside points, I chose to test both, which you will need to do if you did not centre your servo earlier.

First side.

http://images.mobile.eu.org/upload/167171551.jpg

Second side.

http://images.mobile.eu.org/upload/16717167.jpg

The resistor value you want is either the same as the value you found with a centred servo, or if you didn't have a centred servo, add up both values and divide by 2.

Of course you can't get that exact value unless you are lucky, with mine I went for 2.61K resistors.

All servos should be around the 5K mark, so require resistors around the value of 2.5K.

Out of interest I tested to see how far the trim went on my FlySky GT3B controller, the values I got were 2.81k and 2.25k, so as you can see there is a small amount of tolerance for choosing resistor values as you can just adjust the trim on your transmitter.

You can choose two different value resistors to use and then change the trim setting, but it is best to get two of the same value.

Step 5: Remove the pot

Pot removed

http://images.mobile.eu.org/upload/207132346.jpg


Step 6: Solder the resistors on
You need to connect one leg from each resistor together and solder the join to the middle of the three points, then solder the remaining two legs to the other points, each to a different one.

I chose to use surface mount resistors, but any size can be used.

Surface mount resistors in place of the pot.

http://images.mobile.eu.org/upload/207132417.jpg

Step 7: Test the board
Notice at this point the motor is still connected, this is so you can test the board and see if the trim needs adjusting.

Connect the board to your receiver and check that the motor does not spin when the transmitter is centred, if it does then adjust the trim until it doesn't move unless you turn the wheel on your transmitter (assuming the board is connected to the channel used for steering).

Step 8: Remove the motor
If you are going to use LEDs, or anything that requires a specific voltage, make sure to measure the maximum voltage the board provides, do this by turning your transmitter wheel all the way to one side and use a multimeter set to volts to measure the voltage.

Motor removed.

http://images.mobile.eu.org/upload/207132535.jpg

Here is the voltage reading I got with the wheel turned all the way.

http://images.mobile.eu.org/upload/207133245.jpg

Step 9: Connect your electronics
Now you need to attach the electronics you want to use to where the motor was connected.

In my case I connected a JST connector so that I can change what is plugged in, my main use will be for some LEDs though.

http://images.mobile.eu.org/upload/207132741.jpg

Step 10: Complete
And there you go, one finished transmitter controlled device.

It may also be a good idea to put some heatshrink on the board before using it in your RC device.

Here is a short video with the motor still attached and the rotation limiter removed, meaning the board is acting as an ESC.

How to use a servo board as a brushed ESC (0 min 38 sec)


Here is a short video demonstrating the variable brightness on/off LEDs, I admit the brightness range is not great, mainly because I am using a random resistor for the LEDs so they do not reach their brightest level.

How to use a servo board as a variable brightness LED On/Off controller (0 min 31 sec)


If you have any questions please feel free to ask.

#2 Bugman Jeff Aug 20, 2012 08:48 PM

Using some LEDs in parallel( one "this" way, one "that" way), you can use this method to make turn indicators that blink when you turn too :)

#3 x5252x Aug 20, 2012 08:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bugman Jeff (Post 22503435)
Using some LEDs in parallel( one "this" way, one "that" way), you can use this method to make turn indicators that blink when you turn too :)

Good tip, thanks.

Just to expand, you can use a splitter and connect this to the same channel as your steering to get turn signals, but you would need flashing LEDs to make it look right.

You could also do the same for reversing lights, but realistically by the time you've got all the separate boards it's probably cheaper and easier to go for some sort of kit.

#4 Bugman Jeff Aug 20, 2012 09:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by x5252x (Post 22503523)
Good tip, thanks.

Just to expand, you can use a splitter and connect this to the same channel as your steering to get turn signals, but you would need flashing LEDs to make it look right.

I forgot about the blinking part of the LED blinkers :o

#5 XFM Aug 20, 2012 10:55 PM

Would it be possible to have 2 of these servo boards connected to 2 receiver ports but with only one common signal wire.

Then the output wired in series, will it double the voltage?

Thanks

#6 x5252x Aug 20, 2012 11:11 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by XFM (Post 22504568)
Would it be possible to have 2 of these servo boards connected to 2 receiver ports but with only one common signal wire.

Then the output wired in series, will it double the voltage?

Thanks

No, I believe that would basically be creating a short, the same as if you connected the positive to ground on the receiver.

Please someone correct me if I'm wrong on this though.

#7 vinnieg Oct 19, 2012 09:33 AM

This is a great tutorial! Thanks for the info!

question : instead of performing steps 4 , 5, and 6, would it be possible to simply center and glue the POT to a fixed position ?

#8 Bugman Jeff Oct 19, 2012 08:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by vinnieg (Post 23044134)
This is a great tutorial! Thanks for the info!

question : instead of performing steps 4 , 5, and 6, would it be possible to simply center and glue the POT to a fixed position ?

That's what I did. If you don't get it glued perfectly centered, you can correct it with the trims in your Tx.

#9 veggieslinger Oct 19, 2012 10:59 PM

when i found out about this a few years ago i was very intrigued. an old rc buddy of mine showed me how he used the servo board as an esc, he used one in a small tug style boat. i did the same thing but in an airboat application in my bathtub:)

#10 dave1993 Oct 22, 2012 08:56 AM

ive also been using this trick for some time now but dont bother removing the pot anymore. its much simpler to leave it in and because these tend to drift with temperature and voltage makes zeroing easier. in fact i often leave the motor attached too for things like nanobot and boat applications.

sometimes i do change the value of the deadband resistor so full stop is not so critical.

#11 flybyjohn Dec 04, 2012 09:08 PM

will this work if you have an airplane tx. I want to use this application on a micro airplane but the voltage only goes from zero to full volts in half the stick movement. I need for the voltage to be at zero when the stick is all the way down and at full voltage when the stick is all the way up. Does any body know how to do this?

#12 Bugman Jeff Dec 05, 2012 06:35 AM

You may be able to turn down your endpoint or dual rate settings on that channel to get the voltage where you need it.

#13 flybyjohn Dec 05, 2012 07:31 AM

I was able to center the channel all the way to one end and then adjust my travel to 50% each way and that seems to be working well enough. Since I don't need reverse, I was trying to get rid of the ability for the servo board to be able to put out neg. voltage but could not figure it out. I just adjusted the stick trim to not be able to go as far as to get into the neg. voltage.

#14 x5252x Dec 05, 2012 07:34 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by flybyjohn (Post 23443618)
will this work if you have an airplane tx. I want to use this application on a micro airplane but the voltage only goes from zero to full volts in half the stick movement. I need for the voltage to be at zero when the stick is all the way down and at full voltage when the stick is all the way up. Does any body know how to do this?

I'd try connecting this up with the pot on, leaving the stick at the bottom, then rotating the pot so that the servo board gives out 0v, then check the max voltage by moving the stick all the way up, then adjust the end point so that when the stick is pushed all the way up, it gives out slightly below the max voltage, then increase the end point by a very small amount so it will give the max. That should provide you with what you need.

#15 bbz Jan 24, 2013 03:15 AM

is there anywhere i might find a 2.5k ohm resistor in old electronics or what not?


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