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        Discussion V-tail to aileron mixing?

#1 Teamsherman Aug 08, 2012 06:13 AM

V-tail to aileron mixing?
 
Hi guys,

I've got a v-tail plane here that I've set up, but I want to add a v tail to aileron mix.

Now does the right v tail surface go up if the right aileron goes up? The manual here says they need to move in opposite directions which seems like it would be counter-productive! Any help appreciated.

At ghe moment if I bank right and the right aileron goes up so does the right v tail surface, is that right?

For elevator both v tail surfaces move up for up and Down for down. For rudder the both go in different directions.

#2 scirocco Aug 08, 2012 08:40 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Teamsherman (Post 22388411)
Hi guys,

I've got a v-tail plane here that I've set up, but I want to add a v tail to aileron mix.

Now does the right v tail surface go up if the right aileron goes up? The manual here says they need to move in opposite directions which seems like it would be counter-productive! Any help appreciated.

At ghe moment if I bank right and the right aileron goes up so does the right v tail surface, is that right?

For elevator both v tail surfaces move up for up and Down for down. For rudder the both go in different directions.

If you're trying for the equivalent of an aileron-rudder mix, you want them opposite. Right aileron goes up, right wing down. You want a bit of right yaw, so right ruddervator has to go down/right, and left ruddervator up/right. Pitch forces cancel out, leaving a right yaw force.

If you were thinking trying to use the v tail to assist roll, ie moving in the same sense as the ailerons, I expect you'd get some pretty nasty adverse yaw.

#3 Mr Kamikaze Aug 08, 2012 08:42 AM

Yep for the mix you ask they need to be opposite to aileron Think about it. If you roll right your right aileron is up, which pushes that wing down. If the tails went up as well they are going to try and yaw the plane in the opposite direction of the roll.

And for rudder they need to be opposite.

It helps if you try and visualise the air moving over the wings and tail and what effect deflecting a surface will have on that air, then the surface moves opposite to that.

#4 AeroNut45 Aug 08, 2012 08:43 AM

The manual is right.
The easiest to remember is turning each V-tail half vertical, like a rudder post. You will notice each moving surface will turn right when you apply right rudder.

#5 Teamsherman Aug 08, 2012 04:00 PM

Thanks fellas, I'll rectify it today!

#6 Teamsherman Aug 08, 2012 05:58 PM

Ok, now when the right aileron goes up, the right v-tail goes down and the left goes up and vice versa for the left side. Left aileron goes up, the left taileron ( I made that word up ) goes down.

Is this right?

#7 steve wenban Aug 08, 2012 06:04 PM

Its called a ruddervator , the best idea to get it straight was a couple of post back up . Think about each side of the stabilizer upright in a fin position now if you apply a right turn your port aileron will go down and your now rudder will turn right . Does that help

#8 scirocco Aug 08, 2012 06:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Teamsherman (Post 22393934)
Ok, now when the right aileron goes up, the right v-tail goes down and the left goes up and vice versa for the left side. Left aileron goes up, the left taileron ( I made that word up ) goes down.

Is this right?

Taileron is used to refer to a horizontal tail that has differential movement for roll control, eg most fighters with all moving tails (known as stabilators because there is no separate stab and elevator). http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stabilator

#9 steve wenban Aug 08, 2012 06:18 PM

But as they are V tails and used to induce Yaw not roll they are ruddervators
http://aviationglossary.com/ruddervator/

#10 scirocco Aug 08, 2012 07:07 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by steve wenban (Post 22394117)
But as they are V tails and used to induce Yaw not roll they are ruddervators
http://aviationglossary.com/ruddervator/

Certainly are, as per post #2

#11 Teamsherman Aug 08, 2012 07:37 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by steve wenban (Post 22393986)
Its called a ruddervator , the best idea to get it straight was a couple of post back up . Think about each side of the stabilizer upright in a fin position now if you apply a right turn your port aileron will go down and your now rudder will turn right . Does that help

Yep got it! Thanks heaps everyone !

I may even maiden it this arvo if the wind dies down a little.


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