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#1 hastf1b Dec 29, 2011 11:16 AM

Older Flying Wings (Nurflügel)
 
1 Attachment(s)
Large flying wing by Wolfgang Zwilling.

From "Der Flugmodellbau" october 1955

Heinz

#2 hastf1b Dec 29, 2011 11:24 AM

2 Attachment(s)
A further design of Wolfgang Zwilling.

From "Der Flugmodellbau" march 1954

Heinz

#3 Knoll53 Dec 29, 2011 02:55 PM

The 1954 model has the benefits of a swept wing (the tips are well behind the CG for pitch control) without the problems associated with spanwise flow.

All done without carbon fiber. Amazing.

I wonder if there were ANY high performance flying wings here in the States back then.

Kent

#4 Shedofdread Dec 29, 2011 03:55 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Knoll53 (Post 20263961)
I wonder if there were ANY high performance flying wings here in the States back then?

Jack Northrop may have had one or two... ;)

#5 Knoll53 Dec 29, 2011 06:24 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Shedofdread (Post 20264434)
Jack Northrop may have had one or two... ;)

Oh sure..... I guess some would say that those were high performance, for what they were.:) No high aspect ratio sailplanes from Jack though.

#6 miniphase Dec 30, 2011 03:04 AM

not sure if they strictly count as vintage, but Jupp Wimmer's wings certainly have that feel to them- http://flyingwinggliders.blogspot.co...pp-wimmer.html

#7 Zaurak3 Dec 30, 2011 09:40 AM

2 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by Knoll53 (Post 20263961)
I wonder if there were ANY high performance flying wings here in the States back then.

There were the full-scale Burgess-Dunne wings here 100 years ago:

http://www.ctie.monash.edu.au/hargrave/dunne.html

Roger

#8 Knoll53 Dec 30, 2011 10:09 AM

Cool
Thanks for the link.

Kent

#9 nmasters Dec 30, 2011 10:49 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Zaurak3 (Post 20270633)
There were the full-scale Burgess-Dunne wings here 100 years ago:

http://www.ctie.monash.edu.au/hargrave/dunne.html

Roger

John Dunne doesn't get the recognition he deserves. He invented the swept wing with washout and elevons at the tips. He patented elevons some time before WWI and one of his 'wings was the first documented inherently stable airplane. It's a shame that heart disease forced him to retire early because at the time nobody understood his theories well enough to continue developing the type.

Speaking of old Nurflügeln: Tailless Tale by Ferdinando Galè has hundreds of drawings and math. It looks like it's still available from the B² book store.

--Norm

#10 hastf1b Dec 31, 2011 05:08 AM

Erwa 8
 
4 Attachment(s)
The fuselarge has enough space for rc.

Heinz

#11 Knoll53 Dec 31, 2011 09:40 AM

Erwa 8
 
I've always admired the free flight guys. The kings of light wing loading.

I couldn't make out a date on the drawings. Is this design from the 1950's?

Kent

#12 hastf1b Dec 31, 2011 10:41 AM

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Yes 1950/51. All plywood and spruce.

Heinz

#13 Jim Deck Dec 31, 2011 12:55 PM

Speaking of older flying wings
 
I recently acquired a Robbe Geier. I'd like to set it up for winch launching & aerotow but I need the center of gravity and towhook locations. Can anybody help?

#14 hastf1b Dec 31, 2011 02:17 PM

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Robbe Geier

CG is 106 mm behind the leading edge.

Heinz

#15 Jim Deck Dec 31, 2011 05:58 PM

Thank you
 
Thanks for the Geier information so promptly.
A HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ALL!!


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