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        Discussion FPV landings

#1 kyle7119 Feb 03, 2010 07:26 PM

FPV landings
 
So, I would like to get some helpful facts on how to land while flying FPV. Here is my situation:
I have an Easy Star with the EZ Glider wings, and I feel like I need a football field or two to land it. So far, I have only flown in fields where I have this kind of room. However, I would like to be able to go to an open area surrounded by trees. The trick that I would like to learn is how to make my approach above the trees and then drop down really quickly and put it on the ground.

Also, how fast are you guys going when you land. Do you stall it out, or do you fly it onto the ground?

Videos would be wonderful.

#2 Kmart Feb 03, 2010 07:31 PM

Practice. :D

#3 kyle7119 Feb 03, 2010 07:34 PM

So, from an altitude of 50 ft (height of tree?), how much space does it take you to land?

#4 Kmart Feb 03, 2010 07:35 PM

maybe 60 feet? I usually come in slow right over the tree tops, then dive down to almost ground level. Then, I just glide along until it sits down. :)

#5 kyle7119 Feb 03, 2010 07:37 PM

My plane has really sloppy controls at slow speeds. Too high of a stall speed.

#6 merkzu Feb 03, 2010 07:38 PM

I fly out of a small grass area outside my house sometimes and descend in a tight circle pattern until I'm on the ground. It might be pretty hard to do with easyglider wings unless you have the ailerons hooked up.

#7 Dirt Brakes Feb 03, 2010 07:39 PM

can you dial in flaperons on your radio?

bill

#8 kyle7119 Feb 03, 2010 07:41 PM

I have ailerons. I don't know about flaperons. I'll have to check. Can the Futaba 7C do flaperons?

#9 PeteSchug Feb 03, 2010 07:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kyle7119 (Post 14253287)
I have ailerons. I don't know about flaperons. I'll have to check. Can the Futaba 7C do flaperons?

As long as you have two channels for the ailerons you can do flaperons or spoilerons. Both down or both up while still giving you aileron control. Some planes or pilots work better one way some the other.

Also, it sometimes helps to mix in elevator trim along with either flaperon or spoileron.

I've never used either but I've contemplated it on occasion so I thought I'd throw in my two cents to confuse the issue.;)

Pete

#10 kyle7119 Feb 03, 2010 08:08 PM

Two channels for ailerons!?

#11 IBCrazy Feb 03, 2010 08:35 PM

Why not just land it hot and level? I can plant almost any airplane right where I want it in FPV mode. I actually require less runway. I just aim the nose for a spot about 100 feet away from where I want to touchdown and fly right for that, then level off.

Here's what you do: Bring your plane in fast with the nose down at minimal throttle to maintain maneuverability. You want to come in at an angle between 10 and 25 degrees, so it can be a fairly steep drop. More angle means less throttle. Aim your nose about 100 feet infront of your intended touchdown point. When you get close to the ground shut down your throttle and begin to level off. Do not flare as this will result in a tip stall, but just let the plane land fast but level. An EZ Star will certainly do fine this way.

My best landings are always coming in fast with power on right before the plane touches down.

-Alex

#12 kyle7119 Feb 03, 2010 08:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by IBCrazy (Post 14253920)
Why not just land it hot and level? I can plant almost any airplane right where I want it in FPV mode. I actually require less runway. I just aim the nose for a spot about 100 feet away from where I want to touchdown and fly right for that, then level off.

Here's what you do: Bring your plane in fast with the nose down at minimal throttle to maintain maneuverability. You want to come in at an angle between 10 and 25 degrees, so it can be a fairly steep drop. More angle means less throttle. Aim your nose about 100 feet infront of your intended touchdown point. When you get close to the ground shut down your throttle and begin to level off. Do not flare as this will result in a tip stall, but just let the plane land fast but level. An EZ Star will certainly do fine this way.

My best landings are always coming in fast with power on right before the plane touches down.

-Alex

Interesting, I was doing the exact opposite of that: shallow approach angle, really slow approach speed, and a flare right at the end. I will definitely try this new method.

#13 galaxiex Feb 03, 2010 08:47 PM

Just my opinion.... ;)

While there are "standard" accepted practices of landing aircraft, I think FPV pilots need to find the method that works best for each individual and the plane they are flying.

Now I don't claim to have mastered FPV landings.... :rolleyes:

But here are a couple of vids with landings at the end, of 2 completely different aircraft.

The landings are "similar" yet the method to achieve each landing was different.

....and certainly weather/wind conditions play a part.

As someone above said.... Practice... get to know your aircraft and what it is capable of in different conditions.

If possible, practice touch and goes where you have lots of room, and try to shorten the landing each time, before trying to set down in a tight area.

This first vid I had lots of room to line up...

The second vid was landing in a fairly tight location, I did have an approach along the road, but not obvious is the fence I had to stay above.

Oh, and it was WITH the wind.... :rolleyes:


Slow Stick FPV Over 1000 ft. altitude, April 19 09 (4 min 2 sec)


Radical RC Wright Stick FPV flight #2 (5 min 20 sec)

#14 Crist Rigotti Feb 03, 2010 08:53 PM

Kyle,
Check your pm.

#15 scrtsqrl Feb 03, 2010 08:55 PM

When landing on a "spot" in a tight space, I fly relatively fast and into the ground (a bush is better...lol.).

Here's what I did when I was learning a couple of years ago...

Quote:

Originally Posted by scrtsqrl (Post 7776969)
[B]
LANDINGS

I like to fly from small fields. To do that safely, I have to land precisely and accurately.

I have to control two parameters: Glideslope and Line-up. Flying the SAME glideslope and the SAME line up will put the plane on the SAME spot in the LZ.

Here's my wag at trying to make that happen:

I use my carry box as a landing aid. I stand the cover up around 3 paces from the box itself laying flat. If I am on glide slope and line-up, I should see a "T" as I fly in.

I also found that the carry box is highly visible in the terrain, and marks the landing aimpoint very well, especially when I'm flying into the sun, when the ground is totally washed out...

The proceedure goes:

1. Mark on top of an Initial Approach Point. I use a church, because it is easily distinguishable from the air.
2. Find the dot & go to it. This gives me a rough heading.
3. Make out the "T". This gives me more precise glideslope and line-up.
4. Maintain the "T" until the LZ is made.
5. Wave off and bring it arround if I get too far out of parameters.

It seems to work. Using this, I've been able to put my plane into the purple bush around 7 out of 10 times. I'm sure that number will get better. The true test will be when I try it out in some other location.

Check this out:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8UwYjzHgvPY

Night Landings

Same procedures I use in daylight. The difference are four lights...Red flasher on the back "nav aid"...White Flasher on the forward "nav aid" for glideslope and line up...an orage light (plastic pumpkin left over from halloween) to mark the forward edge of the bush...and a flashlight shined by my son at the airplane so that I know not to hit him (and me, 'cause I'm standing next to him).

So long as I am on line-up, the flashing light just becomes visible once I am on glideslope. I keep it barely visible on top of the middle light...I stay on glideslope. Very easy and reliable.



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