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Posted by eye4wings | Aug 02, 2014 @ 05:33 AM | 1,106 Views
In the past accurately equipping a model with scale sized propellers with the correct number of blades tended to be a very expensive business. Most commercial concerns offering three-bladed wooden props tend to demand a premium for their product to reflect the extra effort involved.

I have posted on the forum before on my very much cheaper alternative and shown that I could in the past produce four three-bladed props for less money than the purchase of these expensive items just by buying the much cheaper 2-blade props available and spending about an hour cutting, gluing and painting.

I have also been asked how strong my DIY props are and I now have had an unfortunate arrival at ground level that broke a blade off. Whereas some commercial products have cast blades in use because they are made using simple cuts and metal pins for economy, my props have never suffered from any such failure. The last 2 photos testify to the fact that a properly made joint fixed using ordinary wood glue does not fail. Rather the blade itself splinters.

Of course the down side is that getting the stump of the old blade out so as to set a new one in is quite a job - but it is possible.

So here is my photo sequence from build to destruction!...
Posted by eye4wings | May 29, 2014 @ 05:28 PM | 2,723 Views
There has at times been discussion about Servo tabs, their effectiveness, the ways of providing them on our models, and the reasons for doing so in various threads. I thought that it was probably time that I (as one who is convinced by the savings to be made in using them) put down on virtual paper a visual and very brief how to, so here is my offering.

I hope it is helpful and informative, but chapters have been written on the subject so the information in one page is bound to be sketchy. Please feel free to comment if you feel it can be improved - or if I could have put it clearer.
Posted by eye4wings | Mar 26, 2012 @ 06:47 AM | 4,528 Views
I only just realised how useful it could be to all the scratch builders on RC Groups if I posted my wing-building method for everyone who wants to to copy - so here we go!

The purpose of this method is
1. To produce a wing structure with the least amount of material wastage.
2. To make it as strong as possible for the least amount of material used.
3. To eliminate as far as possible the need to work out the various wing sections throughout the span.
4. To minimise templates and jigging.

The light gradually dawned during my design and building of the Miles Messenger and Gemini models, starting when I realised that the manufacturing method used had been to produce a top surface and bottom surface of the wings then join them together by the completion of the spars. I noticed that many other wings have structures which are very different from what we traditionally used in our hobby and then wondered why we took to cutting out complete wing aerofoil sections for our wings in one piece. for a tapering wing every single rib is different and has to be worked out beforehand following which even positioning them with great care on balsa sheet inevitably produces a large quantity of wastage - further compounded by all the lightening cut-out bits - all of which is money in the bin.

Why not build so as not to put the material there in the first place?

The purpose of wing ribs is firstly to maintain the intended shape of the wing surface and to prevent the main spar(s)...Continue Reading
Posted by eye4wings | Apr 16, 2011 @ 07:13 AM | 5,002 Views
After two years' flying the Q6 finally hits the shelves in the May issue of RCMW.

http://www.trapletshop.com/gb/p/1376...ival-q6-petrel

Parts kit and plan are now available.

The Traplet shop website has had a bit of a revamp and looking better now - well done all!
Posted by eye4wings | Oct 03, 2010 @ 08:12 AM | 5,293 Views
I am at last up to date with sorting out all the bits and pieces of video on my computer and have posted them on YouTube. All are of published plans (see the Traplet list in my blog for links). So that these are kept in one place for reference purposes I list them below...
Gloster Meteor F3
Meteor.mpg (1 min 29 sec)

Casa Ca212 Aviocar
...Continue Reading
Posted by eye4wings | Jun 09, 2010 @ 01:13 PM | 6,591 Views
I used to reckon that I built three or four new models every year, but since I have experienced the advantages of flying larger scale models the number turned out has, understandably, dropped to about two. Consequently as there are more sheets per design and producing finished design drawings is my least favourite part of the production system to publication, my publisher has not had much from me for the last year or two.
What he has had from me over the years however is building to quite a long list, which I reproduce below. (updated since the Traplet site revamp)
The links given are to the page at Traplet's shop where the plan can be ordered.

AIRCRAFT TYPE, WING SPAN
Percival Q6, 112"
http://www.trapletshop.com/gb/p/1376...ival-q6-petrel
PART KIT
http://www.trapletshop.com/gb/p/1381...ival-q6-petrel

DH.90 Dragonfly, 86"
http://www.trapletshop.com/gb/p/13711/dh90-dragonfly

DH83 Fox Moth 76"
http://gb.trapletshop.com/dh83-fox-moth

Zenair CH701UL 80"
http://gb.trapletshop.com/zenith-ch701ul-zenair

Hawker Tempest 5, 42”
http://www.trapletshop.com/gb/p/1337...r-tempest-mk-v

Alco Frolic (sport design), 51.5”
http://www.trapletshop.com/gb/p/13376/alco-frolic

Percival Prentice T1, 60”
http://www.trapletshop.com/gb/p/1337...40-prentice-t1

Miles M-38 Messenger, 71.5”
http:...Continue Reading
Posted by eye4wings | Oct 27, 2009 @ 12:32 PM | 6,145 Views
The Mean Modeller's Mandate:

To attempt by any means available to make as little balsa wood (and other modelling materials) fill up as much space as possible and still stay in one piece while above ground level.

General Dicta:

'Lead' is a swear word.
Weight is the enemy.
DO NOT 'Beef it up' just in case.
The smaller a scale model is and/or the heavier it is built, the faster it will have to fly to stay aloft and the less 'scale' the flight will inevitably appear to the watcher.
Reynolds numbers work against the smaller wing.
Added weight means added drag, which means more power will be needed to fly the model. which means larger motors and batteries (and more cost), which means more structure to carry it, which means more weight, which means more drag, which means... that it is impossible to win by doing it that way.
Saving structural weight where it can be spared means that the model will fly at a lower speed, which means it will take less power to fly it, which means smaller motors and batteries (and smaller outlay), which means further savings in structure... etc...
The greatest bending moment for a wing to withstand is at the joint to the fuselage so why use constant thickness spar members right to the tip? Even if the wing is a constant chord one, and only just takes the strain at the root, that is a lot of wasted material and weight nearer the tip.

For the last ten years or so I have used tapered span-wise spar members, typically 1/2"x1/4...Continue Reading