This is the amount of weight to get 58 oz-in of torque at the servo arm. It is impressive to think that all that load is being held by a plastic output spline. The HS-6635HB happily lifted these giant nuts and more. See below for more details.

weights.jpg - 2.28 MB - Views: 379
Posted by: 96S14 on Jul 19, 2006 05:47 AM
This is the amount of weight to get 58 oz-in of torque at the servo arm.  It is impressive to think that all that load is being held by a plastic output spline.  The HS-6635HB happily lifted these giant nuts and more.  See below for more details.
 
test_setup_1.jpg
This mess actually does something. The multimeters are used to measure the current and voltage supplied to the servo. The dial indicator allows me to measure the position of the servo horn.
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test_setup_2.jpg
Here you can see the frame made to hold the servo in place. The dial indicator is pushed by the servo arm.
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weights.jpg
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zero-load.jpg
This graph shows the servo's ability to return to the same home position under no load. 20 trials were performed and the angular deviation from the median position is shown on the vertical axis. As can be seen, this is a very accurate servo!
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40_oz-in.jpg
This graph shows the "droop" that the servo experiences when putting out 40 oz-in of torque. Note that the deflection from the zero load position is only a few degrees and that it's less at 6.0v than it is at 4.8v...a good reason to use 5 cell RX packs i
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